15 Different Types Of French Bulldogs: A Colorful Guide

types of frenchies

Everybody loves a Frenchie, but did you know that they come in at least 15 color variations? I had no idea there were so many types of Frenchies!

The only colors that are recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) are brindle, brindle and white, cream, fawn, fawn and white, fawn brindle, white — but there are lots of cutie pies out there in other colors.

Some colors of this dog breed are very uncommon. French bulldogs have been one of the most popular dog breeds in the US and elsewhere for years. They are also one of the most popular French dog breeds.

The rare colors of the Frenchie breed are blue, lilac, blue and tan, mouse, chocolate and tan, and Merle. Rare-colored Frenchies are prone to health and genetic problems because irresponsible breeders concentrate on colors rather than health.

Types of French Bulldogs

Frenchies have square heads, a pushed-in nose, and pointy, big ears. From the French bulldog’s big bat ears and sweet temperament to their apartment-friendly size, people love ’em. In 2023, they stole the Labrador Retriever‘s spot as the number one most popular pet in the US.

Frenchie dogs are affectionate, alert, playful, smart, friendly, good with kids and animals, fun-loving and intelligent dogs. They don’t need much exercise, so they are low maintenance and great companions for everyone. Although they can be a bit stubborn breed too especially when training.

Let’s take a look at the Frenchies:

1. Blue French Bulldog

different types of frenchies

A blue French bulldog breed has a blue-gray coat color. The color is a result of a genetic mutation that results in a dilution of the black pigment in their fur, making them blue-gray.

They are very expensive in the blue-gray color. Females can be up to $5,790, and males can cost $5,490. One breeder said they can cost $10,000! This color is rare, which is why they are so pricy.

Many breeders adore the French bulldog breed and want to create healthy and beautiful puppies. Sadly, some people breed animals just to make money.

It’s important to find a reputable breeder who cares about the dogs’ health and well-being, or you may wind up with a puppy suffering from health issues. That would be tragic, and you’d have lots of vet bills.

There are also French bulldog breed rescue organizations in different states that have adorable Frenchies that need homes.

2. Brindle French Bulldog

types of french bulldogs

The brindle pattern is the most common of the color variations. Brindle French bulldogs can be fawn, cream, yellow, or reddish with a black pattern that’s like a tiger stripe.

The brindle of the Brindle French bulldogs comes from the K-Locus gene, which is responsible for the fawn and dominant black brindle colors. A Brindle French bulldog can cost between $3,990 to $5,490.

3. Chocolate French-Bulldog

different type of frenchies

The chocolate French bulldog is rare and can be light tan or dark brown — some are brindle. The chocolate color gene is a recessive chocolate gene, so both parents need to have that chocolate gene to make a true chocolate Frenchie puppy.

A True Chocolate Frenchie can cost $4,500-$5,000.

4. Cream French Bulldogs

frenchies types

Cream Frenchies have very pale coats that are mostly ivory or off-white. Cream French bulldogs can have lighter cream edges on their ears. The color comes from a recessive gene from the fawn variation.

True Cream Frenchies have black noses as well as black eye rims, paw pads, and black lips. They also have dark brown or black eyes that show no visible white. Cream French bulldogs cost $2,500-$5,500.

5. Fawn French Bulldog

types of french bulldog

The Fawn French bulldog is one of the more common French bulldog colors. The Fawn French bulldog has colors ranging from beige to golden tan fawn coats to a golden or reddish tan.

Fawn French bulldog puppies can cost from $3,500 to $12,000, averaging $5,300. Fawn Frenchies are recognized by the AKC and usually have a black mask.

6. Fluffy French Bulldog 

what does a french bulldog look like

Fluffy Frenchie dogs have some fuzzy fluff. This French bulldog is the only one with a medium coat and requires a little more grooming. Fluffy Frenchies have fuzz created by the LH gene or the Fibroblast Growth Factor.

They are rare because a French bulldog needs two of those genes to have fluff. They cost between $10,000 to $19,000 because of their rarity!

7. Isabella French Bulldog

french bullies

“Isabella” is a dilute color gene that affects the production of melanin and creates a fawn-colored coat with a blue-grey tint. This color is also known as “lilac” or “lavender.” Isabella is rare and in demand.

These hard-to-find Isabellas are $8,990-9,990 for males, and females cost $9,990-$10,990. Another source said they cost $30,000!

8. Lilac French Bulldog

show me a picture of a french bulldog

The Lilac Frenchie dog breed is very uncommon. Usually, breeders on the West Coast of the US are the ones able to breed them. They have a purple lilac coat color and must carry blue and chocolate genes.

The Lilac French bulldog color is very similar to the Blue French bulldog breed. You can tell them apart because Lilac Frenchies don’t have the brown gene, so Lilacs have more of a purple tint.

Lilacs cost $4,500-$5,500 –those blue and chocolate genes are expensive!

9. Merle French Bulldog

Merle French Bulldog

Merle French bulldogs have a marble/splotchy pattern. Breeders use a genetic pairing of a dominant merle gene from one parent and a recessive gene from the other, and the merle gene dilutes pigmentation. It also makes their eyes blue and the nose pink (or the nose has red pigmentation).

Breading merles is dangerous because double merle (or MM) pups can be blind and/or suffer from deafness or skeletal problems. The Merle gene is a dominant gene, and this is why Merle Frenchies should not be bred with other Merle Frenchies.

Blue fawn merle Frenchies can cost $4,990, but Lilac merle Frenchies are $8,990.

10. Pied French Bulldog

pie face frenchie

The Pied French Bulldog has a coat that’s mostly white with patches of red, blue, or black. Pied Brindle Frenchies look the same as brindle Frenchies except for light fawn brindle patterns in the colored patches, usually on their back.

The pied pattern is when a dog is predominantly white or eggshell, accompanied by darker spots.

The cost of a Pied French bulldog ranges from $4,690 to $5,490 for a male French bulldog puppy and between $4,990 and $5,990 for female French bulldog puppies.

11. Platinum French Bulldog 

dogs like french bulldogs

The Platinum Frenchie is new. They have a rare silver-blue color. This coloring is due to a gene mutation known as the Blue Dilution Gene, which has an iridescent sheen. This is another rare color for a French bulldog.

The coloration looks like white, albino, or cream. Platinum French bulldog puppies cost $7,990-$8,990 for males and $8,990-$9,990 for females.

12. Pure Black French Bulldog

Black French Bulldog

Pure black Frenchies or solid black Frenchies are rare, and some black Frenchies have white patches on their chests, making them classified as brindle. The Black French bulldog has a recessive black gene.

Black French Bulldog males cost around $4,790, and the females are at least $4,990.

13. Sable French Bulldog

full breed french bulldog

Sable French bulldogs have fawn coloring (light tan to light brown to dark brown/red coloring) with black and black-tipped hairs, especially on the back, sides, and head. Sable French bulldogs are rare.

A Fawn Sable French bulldog has fawn-colored hair. Sable French bulldogs have fawn-colored hair with darker hairs and etching in the coat, but the fawn is predominant.

Some sable Frenchies have tan points, but these sables aren’t real tan points because the points bleed through and aren’t vivid. Many Sable Frenchies have black or dark masks. They range from light tan to dark mahogany with black hairs at the tips.

Sable Frenchies cost between $4,190 and $4,990 for a male Lilac Sable Frenchie, and a female Sable can be between $4,490 and $5,290.

14. Tiger Brindle French Bulldog

Tiger Brindle French Bulldog

Tiger Brindle Frenchie has a dark coat with fine white hairs in it that look identical to a tiger’s stripe. The Tiger Brindle has a heavy pattern of light fawn streaks all over their dark bodies. The regular brindle French bulldog has a more muddled coloring scheme than the tiger brindle.

15. White French Bulldog

frenchie breeds

The White French bulldog is uncommon. The White Frenchie is frequently confused with the cream and platinum Frenchies, but white ones exist in off-white. The White Frenchie coloring may be the result of brindle, leucism, albinism, or merle genes. Skin, eye, and ear health issues are common.

They are considered off-white and are frequently confused with pied. A true white Frenchie has dark pigment around the lips, nose, and eyes.

An all-white French bulldog is quite unusual and comes from certain genetic combinations. The AKC recognizes it as a standard color. A White Frenchie costs $5,500.

Why Are Frenchies So Expensive

The cost factors of French bulldog puppies include the breeder, fur color, eye color, location of the breeder, time of year, and gender. French bulldog puppies are delivered by C-section because they have big heads. A reputable breeder focuses on the health of the French bulldog puppies as well.

There are French bulldog costs to be aware of.

Frenchistore provided a list of costs that make Frenchies expensive:

  • Progesterone test $50-$100 (usually 2 tests needed)
  • Vitamin supplements – $100
  • Shipping semen – $100 – $300
  • Male stud fee – $1,000 – $7,000
  • Breeding insemination – $100 – $300
  • Ultrasound or X-ray – $100 – $300
  • C-section – $750 – $2,500
  • Puppy food – $100 – $300
  • Full vaccinations for entire litter – $300 – $900
  • Microchip entire litter- $200 – $500
  • DNA/Genetic testing – $700 – $1,000
  • Supplies misc – $200 – $500

FAQs

How Can You Tell if a French Bulldog Is Purebred?

Pedigree papers are the best way to know. A French bulldog should be 11-13 inches tall and under 28 pounds. French bulldog ears should be bat-like, and their tails are short and curled. English bulldogs are heavier than Frenchies.

What Is the Rarest French Bulldog?

The rarest French bulldog is the Isabella French bulldog. They are similar to Lilac French bulldogs in that they are a combination of blue and chocolate.

However, the Isabella Frenchie has a grayish liver coat. Isabella Frenchies are very hard to locate, which also makes them valuable for breeding purposes.

What Two Breeds Make Up a French Bulldog?

English bulldogs and French rat terriers.

What’s the Difference Between Frenchies and French Bulldogs?

There’s no difference. Frenchies are French bulldogs. Here are some other types of bulldogs.

Final Thoughts

There are many types of French bulldogs. A lot of the French bulldog breed colors are rare, and the AKC doesn’t recognize a French bulldog puppy of rare coloration.

French bulldog puppies are born with blue eyes, but most of them experience a change of eye color. This dog breed has a hefty price tag due to moms needing C-sections, prenatal healthcare, DNA tests, etc.

Skin allergies, food sensitivities, and brachycephalic syndrome (breathing issues) are some health problems that different types of French bulldogs are prone to.

Rare-colored Frenchies can be so uncommon that breeders may only produce one every few years, if ever. Usually, rare colors are produced by breeders who specialize in them.

Elise Margulis
Elise Margulis is a talented animal writer and a devoted pet parent residing near Manhattan in a cozy suburb. With a Chow mix and a rescued Siamese as her loyal companions, she's been animal-obsessed since childhood. Penning informative articles on pet nutrition, health, and animal welfare, she's also an avid advocate for adoption and animal rights. When she's not writing, she serves as the editor of two local online news sites. Working from home with her fur babies, she advocates adoption and animal welfare through volunteering and social media. A true animal lover and vegetarian for over 31 years, she's on a mission to raise awareness and make the world a better place for all creatures.

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